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ARE WE PLACING INDIGENOUS and SACRED MEDICINE INTO A COCA-COLA BOX?

Witnessing the abuse on women by spiritual teachers, the grief goes as deep as the abuse

of the land around the sacred territories of medicine and moves me to ask the question : 

can we accompany our consciousness to preserve what is inherently and infinitely precious, our life awareness ?

 

The commodity of spirituality and its consequences are severe on the land and the people,

which are losing their indigenous footprints driven by the global economic system they are inheriting and using

for sustenance, a system where water is becoming a luxury substituted by Coca-cola and beer.

 

In the west we had given up most of our folk medicine, the roots of wisdom from the earth,

and are slowly and hopefully returning to a space of listening.

How can we reclaim access to sacredness and ritual healing and rebuild trust in the relationship with the territory?

Can we find ways to learn from one another and remain in deep respect without the appropriation,

exploitation and influence on different ecosystems?

 

How are soft drinks filled of sugar and alcoholic beverages influencing 

our ability to steward the earth as our microbiome is being put to sleep?

I have seen indigenous guardians loose their inherent power of integrity over sweets and vine, 

the connection is subtle yet rooted, we are what we consume,

from one side of the world to the other, addictions are influencing the ways we take care

of one another and the soil holding us nurtured and fulfilled

Shining the light onto the paths that connect us all, through the choices we make in our daily consumption

and support to a system that either regenerates or perpetuates the suffering,

my choice looks into the wish for awareness and a conscious approach to overseas and local consumption,

ethical and fair to the lands, the communities, the ancestors and the living

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The photographs have been taken in the land of Wirikuta, Mexico

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